Virtual Wall with the 3D printed haptic prototype

Our prototype of our version of the 3D printed Stanford’s Hapkit V3.0 is now functional. It uses the same electronics and motor. The pulley sizes are the same, however the big wheel has been redesigned to properly attach and support the capstan cable. The support wall has been optimized and reinforced using dual common ball bearings.

 

A demonstration of the virtual wall implementation is show in the video below.

 

Follow this project at: http://gomezdegabriel.com/projects/haptic-paddle-3d-printed/

 

Presented Master Thesis about EtherCat for machine control

Last July, the 10th, Ignacio Rosales finally presented his project based on the development of a machine control system using the real-time EtherCat protocol. This project has been co-directed by Víctor Torres López.

The machine is a pick-and-place machine which was previously developed as part of the 2012 Omron’s CEA award.

Extensive work for reverse engineering the Omron servomotors and integrating into the LinuxCNC fwamework has been required.

As a result, a new architecture for the development of machines, with an excellent real-time response and high flexibility has been tested.

In the video, a demo of the system can be seen.

Great work, Nacho!

 

Presented Master Thesis about resin 3D printer

Last July, the 9th, Ernesto Guerrero presented his Master Thesis Based on the development of a 3D printer for nano-hybrid resin printing.

He took the Lisa Simpsons design as a starting point and implemented an innovative bowden-like hydraulic extrusion system. There is still some work to be done before this device may be used for medical and dental applications but he got very promising results.

Thanks, Ernesto!

Presented Master Thesis about CNC machine control using FPGA

Last July, the 8th, Alejandro Barranco, presented his Master Thesis based on the implementation of a control system for a CNC milling machine based using LinuxCNC and the cards from MESA Electronics.

This CNC is based on industrial brushless motors with analog speed controllers from Baldor. He rebuilt all the electronics of the control box, tuned the controllers, installed a  new water-cooled spindle, and customized the control software.

Good job! Thanks, Alejandro.

Fisrt tests of our build of the Hapkit Standford’s haptic device

This is the first test of our build of the Stanford’s Hapkit haptic device built in the School of Engineering of the Universidad de Málaga (Spain) by Juan Gandarias.

This device is intended to be low cost and easy to build, which could make possible teaching haptics, control and telerrobotics all around the world.

In the video, a basic spring model is being tested. Although the motor axis alignment and the friction of the neoprene contact is not perfect,
we are happy with the results.

We used some different components and made some modifications to make it easier to build in Europe. Other changes are coming to make it more robust by using the reprap’s diy experience.

 

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Stay tuned!

Gracias, Juanma!

 

3D printed vacuum ejector: First test

After a previous prototype which didn’t work, I tried to make a new one.

This time I decided to start from scratch with a new design and using ABS.
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I printed this part vertically to have better alignment in the main axis.

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Although some reinforcement with acetone was needed, the prototype is ready to hit the lab.

This time a quick and dirty trial using the hand air gun.

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The results are amazing!20150520_111807_HDR[1]Even without the silicon suction cups, this ejector was able to pick small and big parts.

See the video below

More about this is still to come.

 

Presented Master Thesis about robot self-tooling

Today, Jose María Herrero presented his work about robot self-tooling.

Jose María Presented the Robot Self-tooling concept.

Jose María Presented the Robot Self-tooling concept.

This a new concept involving 3D printing and robotics, where a robot can build and change his fingers automatically.

This setup uses a 3D printer extruder and a fingerless gripper with two dynamixel ax12 servos. He also had to deal with VAL3 for the programming the staubli TX60, and made a program in Python to send the G-codes.

Check the video:

Good job, José María.

Building Zowi, the Open Source Robot

This was a very nice week-end project: building the BQ’s Zowi Open Source Robot.

You just need a 3D printer, 4 standard servos, an Arduino and cables.

Zowi Open Source Robot

Zowi Open Source Robot

I found the source at http://diwo.bq.com/zowi-cc-by-sa/

After the build I found some suggestions:

What a mess!

What a mess!

Hardware: Not all the servos come with the hub size used in the design.

Software: You have to manage to find the ocillator library and correct some misspellings.

Assembly:

  • The BQ arduino version is very cool but is not easy to find. You can use your standard arduino uno making a bigger hole on the head shell.
  • An extra hole for the switch is important too.
  • The hardest part is to fit the head shell with all the cables. A redesign with the arduino fixed toi the chasis instead of the shell could help

Many thanks to the BQ team!

 

New joints for the animatronic robot

Wall-e is an old animatronic robot we build for entertainment and social robotics research.

It is also used as a valuable platform for students projects.

Its joints are driven by different kinds of RC servos, and sometimes the servo axle is used as the robot joint. This is a weak design point and we had to change this.

We needed a neck replacement and we found a “Servo Block” kit for Hitec servos which was perfect for our robot. It was 29€ over our budget (0€) but the MechatronicMan foundation helped again.

Servo Block was perfect for our robot neck

Servo Block was perfect for our robot neck

 

As we ran out of budget we had to design and build new shoulders.

We originally used a Lynxmotion Servo joint with poor axial bearings but it was not solid enough.

Our new design used “standard” skates ball bearings. with two parts: A 3mm width aluminium plate and a 100mm width bearing support.

The old ISEL cpm 3020 did a nice work with a 3mm single flute straight carbide bit.

20140703_135424 (1)20140703_173840 After a sandblasting the plate looks very professional! isn’t it?

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And the final assembly with the quarter scale RC servo gives a solid joint for our robot.

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That’s all. I just wanted to show it.

In the future I’m not using RC servos anymore unless I build a toy robot.

By the way, the joint in action were seen in last post : Animatronic at the Postgraduate Courses presentation 2015-16

Bye.